slimcutta

How To STRIP A JERSEY 101

608 posts in this topic

Thanks @JoeM7392 for the tip on the gloves. I used a pair of latex gloves last night to scrub the last bits of adhesive out. I got a little ambitious with the acetone in one spot and left a slight mark on the fabric that I'll treat with OxiClean today.

The cleaning has come along nicely. The problem is that I pilled the heck out of the jersey in parts when I removed the stitching. I have a box o' jerseys on my way up to Keener, including this one. Hopefully when Keener does this jersey up, it will cover some of the nicks to the material. The biggest concern was with the nameplate, I left two or three 1/2 inch holes along the outer area of the plate where the stitching was. Lesson learned to be more careful. 

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I came across a new one today.  I stripped a jersey, and you can tell they used actual glue to hold the numbers down before they stitched them.  Not the adhesive on the twill, actual glue.  I'm not sure if it was from a hot glue gun, or something else, but it has sucked to get off the jersey.  I went through almost a full can of acetone, but I got the glue off.  I going to have to go over it again to try and get all the adhesive residue off, and I'm not sure it will be possible. I might try goof off to remember the rest.  I just hope the proper lettering will cover any discrepancies.  I was going to switch numbers to a different players, but I am not sure that will be possible.  Anyone come across something like this?

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I have a Montreal Canadians home white the looks like someone just hammered it with glue that resists everything I have hit it with (acetone, goofoff, thinking of trying gasoline and a match)

I now use it as a tester for new chemicals as I find them to see how it will affect the material

It's sad because aside from the glue all over the back it's a really nice old jersey.

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On 8/3/2017 at 3:56 PM, spudrock512 said:

I came across a new one today.  I stripped a jersey, and you can tell they used actual glue to hold the numbers down before they stitched them.  Not the adhesive on the twill, actual glue.  I'm not sure if it was from a hot glue gun, or something else, but it has sucked to get off the jersey.  I went through almost a full can of acetone, but I got the glue off.  I going to have to go over it again to try and get all the adhesive residue off, and I'm not sure it will be possible. I might try goof off to remember the rest.  I just hope the proper lettering will cover any discrepancies.  I was going to switch numbers to a different players, but I am not sure that will be possible.  Anyone come across something like this?

I had one like that once. Turn it inside out and you could see the swirls of glue they used. 

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Who has stripped a Meigray jersey before? I have two from my recent Keener haul, a gamer and a GI, that I stripped and had re-done. I need to remove the Meigray tag from the inside hem. Any issues or considerations before I perform the operation? 

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2 hours ago, Dr_Puck said:

Who has stripped a Meigray jersey before? I have two from my recent Keener haul, a gamer and a GI, that I stripped and had re-done. I need to remove the Meigray tag from the inside hem. Any issues or considerations before I perform the operation? 

Like everything else, I seam ripper, and some patience. I've stripped every type of jersey you can imagine. 

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I've never bothered to remove the MeiGray tag. I probably should.

Anyone know if they are glued down, or are they just sewn?

Edited by mfitz804
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13 minutes ago, mfitz804 said:

I've never bothered to remove the MeiGray tag. I probably should.

Anyone know if they are glued down, or are they just sewn?

Just sewn. 

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I'm removing the tags on the very unlikely chance I'll ever sell them. I don't want anyone to think they're gamers. The one was the Philadelphia Flyers Boucher (originally a Maxime Ouellet) and the other was the Binghamton Senators Elliott (which Keener has graciously agreed to fix and that was originally worn by Shawn Collymore). I just feel like it's a natural part of the process of making it my own jersey to remove the last vestiges of the old jersey. 

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xxx

Edited by Dr_Puck
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On 7/31/2013 at 6:34 PM, Brilliant! said:

Stripping a Swift jersey is a nightmare. That stuff will show EVERYTHING and you can't iron it because the crappy material will melt under the heat of the iron.

I know this is an OLD post, but I am curious if stripping a swift can be done with some TLC and acetone, and not be a complete disaster in the end. I did get a namebar off relatively clean. The nameplate material on an old customization job was wrong and it came off relatively clean. I am hesitant to start on the numbers and may opt to just replace the namebar rather than go for a different player. 

For the record, it's a Denmark jersey I am hoping to switch from 8 BODKER to 51 F.NIELSEN

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Sometimes customized replicas are significantly cheaper than customization costs for a blank so I figure I'll buy the customized replica, strip it, and then re-use those letters/ nameplate on an authentic.

How feasible would it be to strip the name and numbers off a replica jersey and re-use and sew on to an authentic jersey? Also, would there be any other considerations to take into account other than size of letters. 

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1 hour ago, Zeshy25 said:

Sometimes customized replicas are significantly cheaper than customization costs for a blank so I figure I'll buy the customized replica, strip it, and then re-use those letters/ nameplate on an authentic.

How feasible would it be to strip the name and numbers off a replica jersey and re-use and sew on to an authentic jersey? Also, would there be any other considerations to take into account other than size of letters. 

It would depend on how they were applied, no? I have heard that pre-customized replicas sometimes have the kits absolutely cemented down, meaning they would be a b!tch to remove. If it was a kit applied by one of the usual customizers, it'd probably strip.

Whether or not its accurate would depend on who applied it also. 

And keep an eye on the nameplate material as well, it may not be the correct material. 

Unless you are getting the customized replica for like $20, it seems like way too much work and too risky that you might get a bad result. For me, anyway. 

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So I would need to check if its customized properly, nameplate material, and that letters/ sizing is correct

If customization usually runs ~$80 to $100 then I guess it would only make sense to strip a properly customized replica if it costs <$50.

Plus you can save a little bit of cash on the cost of customization and sell the stripped replica to recoup some cash. Thanks for the answer.

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17 minutes ago, Zeshy25 said:

So I would need to check if its customized properly, nameplate material, and that letters/ sizing is correct

If customization usually runs ~$80 to $100 then I guess it would only make sense to strip a properly customized replica if it costs <$50.

Plus you can save a little bit of cash on the cost of customization and sell the stripped replica to recoup some cash. Thanks for the answer.

Let us know if it works in practice rather than in theory.

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What you are proposing just seems like a big waste of time.  Why would you bother investing the time finding a replica with a usable kit and then strip said kit with all the risks associated with doing that work only to save like $40 against the cost of a new kit.  

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1 hour ago, TMLFAN said:

What you are proposing just seems like a big waste of time.  Why would you bother investing the time finding a replica with a usable kit and then strip said kit with all the risks associated with doing that work only to save like $40 against the cost of a new kit.  

This. Plus all the time spent stripping the kit off the replica. 

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Some people have much more time than money. Saving $40 could be a big deal to him, you don’t know.

Plus if he’s like most of us, multiply that by 10 jerseys and it’s $400. 

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15 hours ago, mfitz804 said:

Some people have much more time than money. Saving $40 could be a big deal to him, you don’t know.

Plus if he’s like most of us, multiply that by 10 jerseys and it’s $400. 

this guy gets it

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Customization is expensive, and it often does not add the same dollar amount to a jersey's value. I'm all for finding creative workarounds to reduce that cost, even if I haven't been terribly successful at it myself.

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One other thing to consider, that is, if you don’t do your own stitching, is that even if you successfully get the original kit off the jersey, you still have to pay someone to apply and stitch it on to the new jersey.  This might take a big chunk out of whatever you save by not purchasing a new kit.

Only once have I ever removed a kit from a jersey and reapplied it to another one.  This is because the kit was originally applied to a replica, and later I found an authentic version of the same jersey.  I had ordered the customization for the replica myself, so I knew who made the kit and stitched it on, so I had a good idea about how easy it would be to strip the kit.  I recustomized the replica with another player, so that jersey was still of use to me.  The jersey with the recycled kit turned out really nicely, but I don’t think I’d deliberately buy a replica with an unknown customization history, just to reuse the kit.  It’s too risky.  If just one of the letters got torn or damaged during the stripping process (and I’ve had this happen before) I’d have to reorder a whole new kit anyway, plus I’d be out for how much I paid for the replica.

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1 hour ago, LAK74 said:

One other thing to consider, that is, if you don’t do your own stitching, is that even if you successfully get the original kit off the jersey, you still have to pay someone to apply and stitch it on to the new jersey.  This might take a big chunk out of whatever you save by not purchasing a new kit.

This is true. I think you would likely pay all or most of the savings to a tailor to sew on the kit, as they would likely charge you whatever they charge to sew a patch for each number (minimum of 3, max of 6 charges) and one for the nameplate. 

You might want to check the cost of the sewing if that is going to factor in. If you are doing it yourself, then go forth. 

 

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Hey, all:
I'm relatively new to the forum, though I have lurked for a bit. The level of knowledge here is impressive. I've read through this thread; unfortunately many of the linked images are now missing, so it can be hard for someone new to stripping a jersey to see examples of what is meant by "adhesive residue from stitching", etc.

I just spent the better part of my evening stripping a Flyers home Reebok Edge 2.0 jersey. I *think* the next call is acetone but wanted to see what everyone else thought before I set down that path.

FWIW, I removed 22/TOCCHET and am replacing with 68/JAGR. The nameplate came off without any hint of reside, which is great as the new material will not be as wide.

I removed one number on the back of the jersey and can see a light outline that is about 1/4" wide. It is definitely visible though not SO prominent on the orange material.

The sleeve number left a narrower outline (1/8"?), but it is notably darker; it stands out because the majority of it is on a white area of the sleeve.

Questions:
- Is this what is meant by adhesive residue?
- Are these the kind of stains likely to come out with acetone, a microfiber cloth, and some elbow grease, followed by a cold water wash?
- If that method fails, is it an option to send to EPS to see if they can do a better job? Do they do cleaning without customization if asked?

My plan was to get this to Philly Express for proper customization. I realize the 68 will cover a fair bit of the 22.

The nameplate and back number came off relatively quickly; the sleeve number took a much longer time to remove.

I'd love to get this out in the next few days -- either to Philly Express if successful or to EPS (I'm sending a Devils blank their way within the next 48h).

THANKS!

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Adding a couple photos. For some reason I could not attach them to the previous post via edit.

First pic is of the sleeve number (/residue?), more prominent on the white area. 2nd is of the back of the jersey: no marks from the namebar but obvious outline from the number.

Thanks for any suggestions.

IMG_4050.jpg

IMG_4049.jpg

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Whenever you have dark colored twill pressed to a lighter colored jersey material, it’s common for some of the dark color to bleed and stain the jersey material.  This is not likely to come out unless you use a solvent like acetone.  On the sleeve, most of the jersey material is white airknit, which is fairly easy to clean with acetone.  The back of the jersey however, is orange stretch mesh, which might possibly be prone to bleeding and fading if you use too much acetone, so you should be very careful there.  The number 68 is going to cover a lot of the area formerly covered by the 22, so you may not have to go crazy trying to get every little bit of color out- I would concentrate mainly on the areas you think will still be exposed after the 68 is applied.

 

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